Archive | China

Photos from my time in China.

Different ages.

Shikumen meets skyscraper. Shikumen (Chinese: t 石庫門, s 石库门, p shíkùmén, lit. “Stone Warehouse Gate”) is a traditional Shanghainese architectural style combining Western and Chinese elements that first appeared in the 1860s. At the height of their popularity, there were 9000 shikumen-style buildings in Shanghai, comprising 60% of the total housing stock of the city, but today the proportion is much lower as most Shanghainese live in large apartment buildings.


Different ages., originally uploaded by @yakobusan Jakob Montrasio 孟亚柯.

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In the Jungle, the Mighty Jungle…

Despite efforts to promote Pudong, Puxi remains the cultural and entertainment center of Shanghai. The main shopping centers (including East Nanjing Pedestrian Road, Central Huaihai Road, Qipu Road Apparel City, and Xujiahui), the major bar streets (Hengshan, Maoming, and Julu Roads), and cultural centers such as The Bund, the Shanghai Grand Theatre, and the Shanghai Museum are all located in Puxi.


In the Jungle, the Mighty Jungle…, originally uploaded by @yakobusan Jakob Montrasio 孟亚柯.

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The Ring.

The Nanpu Bridge (simplified Chinese: 南浦大桥; traditional Chinese: 南浦大橋; pinyin: Nánpǔ Dàqiáo), in Shanghai, China, sister bridge to the Yangpu Bridge, is one of the main bridges in Shanghai.
The cable-stayed bridge was designed by the Shanghai Municipal Engineering Design Institute, Shanghai Urban Construction College, and Shanghai Urban Construction Design Institute, with assistance from Holger S. Svensson. It has a main span of 428 meters (1,388 ft), shorter than its sister bridge. It is the 57th longest cable-stayed bridge in the world, opened to the public in 1991.
This traffic ring is where you enter or leave the bridge.


The Ring., originally uploaded by @yakobusan Jakob Montrasio 孟亚柯.

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The Pagoda.

A pagoda is the general term in the English language for a tiered tower with multiple eaves common in Nepal, India, China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Burma and other parts of Asia. Some pagodas are used as Taoist houses of worship. Most pagodas were built to have a religious function, most commonly Buddhist, and were often located in or near temples. This term may refer to other religious structures in some countries. In Vietnam and Cambodia, due to French translation, the English term pagoda is a more generic term referring to a place of worship, although pagoda is not an accurate word to describe a Buddhist temple. The modern pagoda is an evolution of the Ancient Nepal stupa, a tomb-like structure where sacred relics could be kept safe and venerated. The architectural structure of the stupa has spread across Asia, taking on many diverse forms as details specific to different regions are incorporated into the overall design.


The Pagoda., originally uploaded by @yakobusan Jakob Montrasio 孟亚柯.

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People’s Square at Night.

People’s Square (simplified Chinese: 人民广场; traditional Chinese: 人民廣場; pinyin: Rénmín Guǎngchǎng) is a large public square adjacent to Nanjing Road in the Huangpu District of Shanghai, China. People’s Square is the site of Shanghai’s municipal government headquarter building, and is used as the standard reference point for measurement of distance in the Shanghai municipality.


People’s Square at Night., originally uploaded by @yakobusan Jakob Montrasio 孟亚柯.

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