Tag Archives | video

Souls of Zen – Teaser Trailer.

Check out the teaser trailer to my upcoming documentary “Souls of Zen – Ancestors and Agency in Contemporary Japanese Temple Buddhism”:

You can visit the official website at www.soulsofzen.com and stay updated through our Facebook page.

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SHANGDOWN: THE WAY OF THE SPUR — TRAILER DEBUT OF THE MARTIAL ARTS SPAGHETTI WESTERN

SHANGHAI — September 27th 2010 /PRNewswire/ — The new full-length trailer for MK Media Productions’ highly anticipated motion picture Shangdown: The Way Of The Spur debuted today. Shangdown: The Way Of The Spur, starring Christian Bachini and The Way Of The Dragon’s famous villain Jon T. Benn, and directed by Jakob Montrasio, pays homage to the violent and gritty Spaghetti Western genre while adding an Asian twist.

The movie follows Italian cowboy and martial artist Guerino (Christian Bachini) as he searches for his missing sister in a culturally alien Shanghai. With the help of Jiekai (Daddy Chang), a Chinese man whose girlfriend has also gone missing, Guerino wages a one-man war against Shanghai’s biggest crime lord and his multitude of goons, following his one and only rule: kick first and ask questions later.

Shot on location in and around Shanghai, China, the film blends a variety of genres. “I call it a martial arts spaghetti western, or even simpler, an eastern western,” said director Jakob Montrasio, who also wrote, shot and edited the movie.

Using no wires and digital effects, the action scenes – choreographed by lead actor Christian Bachini – will impress martial arts fans like no other film in a long time with a seamless blend of traditional kung fu, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Capoeira, modern MMA and Muay Thai. The extremely experienced action crew, including the Ruan Stunt Team (John Woo’s Red Cliff), make visually distinctive fight and action scenes, both rural and urban. “The action scenes will be hard to forget,” said Director of Photography Steffen Reimann.

Other members of the distinguished behind-the-camera crew include writer and co-producer Michael Ziming Ouyang (Pigs In Zen, Goodbye Shanghai), art director Stanley Xue Lin Yang (Mission: Impossible 3), action & special guest director Richard Chung (Kang: The New Legend Begins), composer Thomas Henz, electro songs by internationally renowned DJ & Music Producer Julius Voigtländer aka Jewelz, editor Gunnar Wagner, still photographer Todd Anthony Tyler, executive producers Paolo Montrasio (Draghi E Spiriti Puri) & Georg Konrad and producer Jiajia Montrasio, who worked on John Rabe before.

The trailer can be seen in high definition on the official film website http://shangdownmovie.com/ and fans can update themselves about the status of the filming and screening locations through Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/Shangdown.

Shangdown: The Way Of The Spur will be released to film festivals in spring 2011.
MK Media Productions is a film and video production company located in Shanghai. Its local operations encompass motion picture production, television production, digital content creation and development of new entertainment products and services. MK Media Productions can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.shanghaivideoproduction.cn.

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“Nuit Blanche”

Once or twice per year I stumble upon a video or a film that captures me with it’s magic, that inspires me, that makes me want to become a filmmaker. Nuite Blanche is such a video.

I am speechless. This short deserves awards, lots of them. It’s perfectly smooth, everything about it is done well (the lighting! the costumes! the actors!) and it gives me goosebumps even the fourth time I watch it.

Well done, Mister Arev Manoukian, well done.

Update:

The Making Of. Now I’m even more blown away. Holy shit is this well produced.

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My Cinematography Showreel 2009.

I finally finished editing my showreel, now that I’m back from New York. I shot some stuff from the exhibition there for the reel. Actually, there’s no need to talk about what’s in it, just watch it!

Jakob Montrasio :: Cinematography Showreel 2009

My works from the last couple of months :: Enjoy.
Contact me :: montrasio@gmail.com
Skype :: jakob.montrasio
LinkedIn :: Facebook

Links to the individual videos seen in the showreel:
Jewelz & Charlie – Spacer Woman 2009 (Video Edit) :: http://vimeo.com/5198175
SHANGHAI. For the New York Skyscraper Museum :: http://vimeo.com/4591644
Shanghai Sideways: On a Changjiang Motor Bike! :: http://vimeo.com/3569937
Wedding in Shanghai, China – MK Media Sample :: http://vimeo.com/2686409
Father John: Zhapu Road Test :: http://vimeo.com/4308283
Eunice Martins in Shanghai :: http://vimeo.com/4845555

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Pictures from the opening of the China Prophecy: Shanghai exhibition in the New York Skyscraper Museum.

On June 24 2009, The Skyscraper Museum in New York City opened China Prophecy: Shanghai, a multi-media exhibition that examines Shanghai’s evolving identity as a skyscraper metropolis. Featuring models of the major iconic structures, including Jin Mao, Tomorrow Square, Shanghai World Financial Center, and the new super-tall Shanghai Tower, as well as computer animations, film, drawings, and historic and contemporary photography of the city, the exhibition combines an in-depth look at the new generation of towers with an overview of the sweeping transformation of the city’s traditional low-rise landscape into a city of towers.

China Prophecy, which runs through March 2010, concludes the Museum’s three-show series FUTURE CITY: 20 | 21 that has examined parallels in the rapid urbanization of New York, Hong Kong, and Shanghai in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Shanghai today is a vast metropolis of 18 million residents–the largest city in the world’s most populous nation. In just three decades, its population has nearly doubled, and the city has been physically transformed by the twin emblems of modernity–high-rises and highways. Formerly a horizontal expanse of dense and sprawling lilong neighborhoods, Shanghai has grown vertically. Nearly 400 high-rises of twenty stories or more were built in the historic core, Puxi, since 1990, and colossal elevated roads fly over old neighborhoods. In the new business district of Pudong on the east side of the river, a master plan dictates taller towers rising from open green space, culminating in a pair–soon to be a trio–of the world’s ten tallest skyscrapers.

The exhibition documents this stupendous urban transformation through film and photographs of old and new Shanghai, including a 20-minute video odyssey traveling the city’s streets and highways filmed by resident director of photography Jakob Montrasio. Evoking the speed and ambition of the city’s futuristic focus are projected computer animations by the Chinese company Crystal CG that create spectacular flyovers of the city before circling the major skyscrapers that are their subjects.

The installation features large models of the major towers that now define–or will soon enhance– the Shanghai skyline. These include an architectural and wind-tunnel testing model of Jin Mao (88 stories; 1999); a presentation model of Tomorrow Square (55 stories; 2003); a massing model and structural engineering model of the Shanghai World Financial Center (101 stories; 2008); and an architectural model and structural computer models of Shanghai Tower (128 stories; 2014), now in development. Other renderings, sections, and construction photographs illustrate a range of technical issues that distinguish these towers, which are all designs of American–and mostly New-York based–architectural and engineering firms. Other major high-rise projects included in the exhibition are KPF’s Jing An complex and SOM’s White Magnolia Plaza, both in development. The issue of global design practice is explored in the exhibition and a related lecture series in fall 2009.

These new Shanghai super-skyscrapers are ambitious in their height and innovative engineering. At 1380 ft. (438 meters), Jin Mao, designed by the Chicago office of Skidmore Owings & Merrill, is taller than the Empire State Building; the Shanghai World Financial Center, designed by New York-based architects KPF, is taller than any U.S. skyscraper at 1614 ft (492 meters); and Shanghai Tower, designed by the American firm Gensler, has an announced height of 2073 ft (632 meters), which will make it the tallest building in China and the second tallest in the world. Typical of these Shanghai towers, as well as those being built today throughout Asia and the Mideast, is a mixed-use program that includes a commercial base, zones of offices, residences or luxury hotels, and restaurants and observation desks on the top floors. The concept of the structure as a “vertical city” is often invoked–offering parallels to early twentieth-century visions of New York as the city of the future.

Sustainable skyscraper design seems an oxymoron to some, but as the exhibition argues, high-rises and high density–in conjunction with mass transit–is a logical strategy for greener cities. The city’s most advanced high-performance design planned to date is the double-glass curtain wall of the Shanghai Tower, which will encircle eight stacked 15-story segments with atrium spaces and sky gardens soaring the full height of the 128-story structure. “Better City, Better Life,” calls out Shanghai’s emphasis on sustainable design as the slogan for the 2010 Expo, which will open May 1, 2010. The exhibition illustrates the Expo in plans, photographs, and a Crystal CG animation of the site and pavilions that emphasizes Shanghai’s self-image as the city of the future.

Three major approaches to urban planning and design are evident in Shanghai today and illustrated in the exhibition. In the historic core Puxi, high-rise commercial and residential development proceeds by razing individual sites or whole low-rise neighborhoods in a patchwork process–either for single skyscrapers or for major mixed-use projects on a mega-block, such as Plaza 66 and the future Jing An complex. The second, radically different approach governs the growth of Pudong, the expansive new area of development on the east side of the Huangpu River, a district that extends to the East China Sea and covers 200 square miles (about half the size of New York’s five boroughs). The name Pudong is commonly used as shorthand for the concentrated skyscraper district, Lujiazui, the Finance and Trade Zone that has developed as Shanghai’s new center for international business. Stimulated by the government’s master plan in 1990, towers have grown as fast as bamboo on land that was principally agricultural or industrial waterfront. Lujiazui, an area the same size (and, indeed, shape) as lower Manhattan, now boasts more than three dozen skyscrapers of 40+ stories, including the 88-story Jin Mao and the 101-story Shanghai World Financial Center. The premise of the Pudong master plan requires open green space surrounding the towers and broad axial avenues that privilege cars over pedestrians. The result is a tower-in-the-park approach that stands in stark contrast to the dense, street-oriented development of Puxi. Historic preservation and adaptive re-use is the third approach to urban planning and design now being practiced in Shanghai. Featured examples in the exhibition are Xintiandi and the North Bund development, Rockbund.

Futurism and Vertical Cities: New York, Hong Kong, and Shanghai

The scale and speed of Shanghai’s rise reproduces and even surpasses Manhattan’s historic ascent in the early twentieth century. As the world’s largest city in 1930, New York boasted a population of 7 million and nearly 200 skyscrapers–more than all other cities combined at that time. Today, as high-rises proliferate everywhere, Hong Kong holds the title with 7,200. Still ascending, though, Shanghai is surely China’s prophecy of the urban future.

It is possible to buy prints from the exhibition’s Shanghai photographs here at ImageKind.

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Shanghai Sideways.

Shanghai Sideways: On a Changjiang Motor Bike! from MK Media Productions on Vimeo.

www.shanghaisideways.com

Discover Shanghai from a sideways look, seated in the side-car of a classic motorbike.

Enjoy an incredible cruise through the city and avoid traffic jams. We make you feel the pulse of this fast changing city and take you from modern Shanghais futuristic look to the heart of the 1920s French Concession. Tours follow a ready-made route or tailor-made to suit your interest.

With Shanghai Sideways, you enjoy the company of a foreign guide and driver who is a long term Shanghai resident. Although our classic motorbikes are antics, they all are perfectly maintained and monitored to guarantee your comfort and safety.

Version 0.3.

Shot with a Sony Cinealta PMW EX1 and edited in After Effects and Final Cut Pro.

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John Rabe – Little Report, With Video!

When Ben commented to my last post about the pictures from the movie John Rabe, I just headed over to YouTube to see if anything had been released there – officially or not. Sadly, I found no trailer – but a little report! DW, Deutsche Welle, was on the set reporting and seemed to have been allowed to capture some stuff with their cameras.

Now the bad side: The video is almost half an hour long and over 60 megabyte big.

But I watched through it and the John Rabe part is right at the beginning! So just watch it until the report of John Rabe is finished, the rest has nothing to with it anymore.

Here we go:

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Official John Rabe(约翰拉贝) pictures.

Most of my friends know what I’ve been doing during the last three months: working with the VFX team on the german movie John Rabe. Sadly, no trailer has been officially released yet so I don’t really have anything to show. But! ‘Majestic Film Verleih’, the company who will bring the movie to german cinemas this year (or so I hope) released 8 official press pictures.

So here you go, a little something to feed your appetite in regards to this movie. 8 pictures!

Dr. Georg Rosen (Daniel Brühl)

Dr. Georg Rosen (Daniel Brühl), employee of the german embassy, tries to handle the threat in regard of the chinese civilians in diplomatic ways.
(Picture: Majestic / Ruggero Rossi)

Dr. Robert Wilson (Steve Buscemi)

Dr. Robert Wilson (Steve Buscemi), leader of Nanjing’s hospital, fights tireless for the survival of the people.
(Picture: Majestic / Tomoko Kikuchi)

Valérie Dupres (Anne Consigny)

Valérie Dupres (Anne Consigny), leader of the International Girls College, can’t enjoy the festivities – she’s worried about her students.
(Picture: Majestic / Tomoko Kikuchi)

Werner Fließ (Mathias Herrmann)

Nazi Werner Fließ (Mathias Herrmann, 3.v.l.) is supposed to take John Rabe’s (Ulrich Tukur, 5.v.l.) place as the leader of the Siemens branch in Nanking.
(Picture: Majestic / Ruggero Rossi)

John Rabe (Ulrich Tukur)

John Rabe (Ulrich Tukur) is desperate, the uncertain future worries him.
(Picture: Majestic / Jörg Gruber)

Members of the international Committee

The members of the international committee for creating a safety zone (Ulrich Tukur, Anne Consigny, Steve Buscemi, Christian Rodska, Daniel Brühl, Shaun Lawton) don’t know how to handle the rush of 250.000 people at once.
(Picture: Majestic / Ruggero Rossi)

Dora Rabe (Dagmar Manzel) and John Rabe (Ulrich Tukur)

Dora Rabe (Dagmar Manzel) tries to convince her husband John (Ulrich Tukur) to leave Nanking.
(Picture: Majestic / Jörg Gruber)

Langshu (Zhang Jingchu, 张静初)

Schoolgirl Langshu (Zhang Jingchu, 张静初), a student of Valérie Dupres, takes pictures of the japanese war crimes in Nanjing.
(Picture: Majestic / Tomoko Kikuchi)

Well, that’s it. As soon as Majestic releases more pictures and / or a trailer, I’ll post it.

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